(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "WADCO news 1920-1923"

WADCO^jrNEWS 



^ 



Volume 2 



Plainville, Mass., June 10, 1921 



Number 11 




(iKOUP OF REPAIR DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES 



The Repair Department 

Although the repair department is 

part of Whiting' & Davis Co., it is 
really a little factory by itself. When 
they moved from the main factory in 
February, there was a great deal of 
work to be done, but with each de- 
partment fully equipped and with 
our capable foreman, Arthur Boehn- 
ke, the work was soon caught up and 
now the repairs are in only a short 
time when they are sent back in Al 
condition. 

Ed. Oorrigan has charge of the 
coloring room, while Henry Curran 
and John Boucher are his assistants. 
Bernard Kohler is still in the lac- 
quering room and Jesse Jillson, the 
polisher. Percy Rhodes and Frank 
Martin are well able to handle all the 
I ench work. But we would never be 
able to get along without our errand 
boy, Ralph Spinney. 

And last, but not least, are all the 
(pretty?) girls, shown in the above 
picture, and with their forelady, An- 
na Reynolds, they all do their part to 
make the repair department the best 
in this part of the country. At lease 
we think so. 



.Air. Hartman sure is funny, 

And he knows it too, 

For when it comes to mocking things, 

lie's right there with the Que. 



Factory Restaurant Well 
Patronized 

Our Restaurant was opened April 
28th, 1920, and has now been in op- 
eration nearly fourteen months with 
an average daily attendance of one 
hundred. This is very gratifying to 
Chef Olsen, as he says, t' e more the 
merrier. He is never so happy as 
when he runs over his regular quota 
for then you see him at his best. 

The restaurant is a place where an 
employee may enjoy one of Chef Ol- 
sen *s dinners amid the cleanest sur- 
roundings. If he prefers he may or- 
der anything on the bill-of-fare for 
which a charge is made accordingly. 
It is not necessary to have the full 
course if one is not so disposed. The 
line is drawn on s tndwicher. ; none of 
these are served, as it is the aim of 
Mr. Whiting to supply hot dinners 
only. Chef Olsen wishes it clearly 
understood that if at any time a pat- 
ron should care for more bread and 
butter with his meal or an extra cup 
of coffee, the same will be gladly 
served without extra <■ rge, for t.-'u 
restaurant is not run for profit and as 
long as it is self-suslainrng the man 
agement feel gratified. To create a 
home-like atmosphere for those not 
able to go home for dinner, ever with 
the thought of serving the best the 
market affords other than the cheap is 
their aim. 

Cont'd pa^e 3, col. 2 



A Trip into Old Mexico 

Cont'd By WALTER RICE 



I have always thought that New 
England had the world beaten when 
it came to stone walls; but, outside of 
San Luis Potosi I saw stone walls 
that would have put our New Eng- 
land forefathers to shame. There were 
miles and miles of wall extending in 
Straight lines across the mesa as far 
as you could see; oftentimes right 
up the sides and over the tops of 
steep mountains, fencing in one ranch 
from another. 

It made one wonder (as our New 
England walls often make us wonder) 
how the owners ever came to spend 
the time and money to fence in so 
many miles of land of such doubtful 
value; but peon labor is cheap in Mex- 
ico and stone is abundant. 

As most of our journey from San 
Luis Potosi to Mexico City was under 
cover of darkness, little can be said 
of the character of that part of the 
country, except that it was very 
mountainous, extremely rugged and 
barren. 

We climbed up over the mountain- 
ous grades until we were ten thous- 
and feet above sea level, and then 
made a descent of twenty-five hun- 
dred feet into Mexico City, where we 
arrived the morning of Saturday, 
March 19th, one week out of Boston. 
Cont'd on pa^e 3, col. 2 



$25.00 in Gold to Winner 



We desire to adopt a new trade- 
mark to be used in our coming ad- 
vertising plan, which will be quite 
extensive. Our advertising agents are 
working on a design, but we may be 
able to create one in our own fac- 
tory which would be better than any- 
thing they can suggest. We want to 
incorporate the full name. Whiting 
& Davis Co. in this design, and for a 
design that we accept we will pay 
$25.00 to the designer. Date closes 
June 20th. 



WADCO NEWS 



Wadco News 



Canada 



Published Semi-Month i v 

by the Employees- of Whitiug' & Davis 

Company, Plainville, Mass. 

Publication Committee 
J. O. Qagnon, Chairman 
W. M. Fuller Lee Higgios F. Gaddes 
O. Soderstrom M iua Simpson 

Editor . . II. B. Rowan 

Asst. Editor, Catherine Kennedy 

COMMERCIAL PRESS-PRINTERS 



EDITORIAL 



Cheer up. Better times are coming:. 
Don't forget to smile. 



CO-OPERATION IN BUSINESS 
One of the managers of Sears, Roe- 
buck & Co., has requested us to send 
the name and address of each and 
every employee, so they may be sure 
and receive one of their latest cata- 
logues. They also ask that our em- 
ployees suggest names. If any em- 
ployee desires to submit full names 
and addresses to us. we shall be glad 
to forward them to Sears, Roebuck & 
Co. 



THE ADVENT OF FANCY MESH 
Fashion decrees that fringe, tassels 
and embroidery are just now the 
proper things with which to adorn 
Milady's costume. In keeping with 
this decree our mesh bags have, figur- 
atively speaking, taken Dame Fashion 
by the hand. 



There is an exceptionally good car- 
toonist in the factory. It takes but a 
few moments spare time. We would 
appreciate her kindness greatly, in of- 
fering a few cartoons. 



In nature nothing can be given, all 

things are sold. 



If you've got to say mean things, 
go down in the cellar and talk to 
yourself. 

Honestly, now, do you deserve 
Miss Fortune, or misfortune? 

Lose your temper, and sooner or 
later you'll lose your job. 

It's better to be in love with your 
work than in love with yourself. 

Don't be impatient. The biggest 
jobs in America are nearly all held 
by men over forty-five, most of them 
by men over fifty. 




The above picture gives only a fair 
idea of our Canadian branch. Many 
have heard about there being a branch 
in Canada and we hope in the near 
future to tell you of some interesting 
things relative to it, provided Mr. 
Cook will take up his pen on behalf 
of Wadco News. 



BRADSTREET'S STAPLE 
PRICES 
The Bradstreet average for June 1 
compares as follows with preceding 
months and years : 

June 1, 1921. ...$10. 6169 
May 1, 1921.... 10 8208 





Apr. 


1. 


1921.. 


. 11 3749 




Mar. 


1, 


1921.. 


. 11 8630 




Fe'x 


1, 


1921.. 


. 12.3689 




Jan. 


1. 


1921.. 


. 12 6631 




Dec. 


1. 


1920.. 


. 13 62G3 




Nov. 


1, 


1920.. 


. 15 6750 




Oct 


1, 


1920.. 


. 16 9091 




Sep. 


1, 


1920.. 


. 17 9746 




Auk. 


1. 


1920.. 


. 18 8273 




July 


1, 


19:0.. 


. 19.352 \ 




Feb. 


1. 


1920*. 


. 20 869) 


*H trhest for 


(he period 










June 


1, 


1920.. 


.$19 875" 




June 


1, 


1919.. 


. 18.0903 




June 


1. 


1918.. 


. 18 9818 




June 


1, 


1917.. 


. 15 4680 




June 


1, 


1916.. 


. 11 68*7 




June 


1. 


191 V. 


. 9 7428 




June 


1, 


1914.. 


. 8 6221 




June 


1, 


1918.. 


. 9 072! 




June 


1, 


1912.. 


. s-.ro 1 ? 




June 


1. 


19 1 1.. 


. 8 "29 1 




.Trie 


1. 


19'0.. 


. 8 910' 




June 


1, 


1909.. 


. 8 ^9 




June 


1. 


190=!... 


. 7 7227 



The groups that make up the index 
Dumber compare as follows with the 
preceding month and with (he highest 
month of 1920: 

June I. 
1«?1 

Breadstuff* $0.1437 

Live stock 3^ n 9 

Provisions 2 72 C 

Fruits 3"3 _ . 

H'des and leather.. 1 4 r .00 

Texfles 2.6136 

Meta's 6' 

Coal and coke 0139 

Oils 4798 

Naval stores 0941 

Build;njr m~t?rials.. .1791 
Chemicals & drugs 10719 

Miscellaneous 4303 

Total $10 6169 



Mav l, 


F<'i 1, 


192 1 


1920 


$0.13 13 


$0 2257 


.4185 


.6610 


2.8566 


4.4003 


.3635 


.4806 


1.4600 


2.7700 


2 6928 


7 . 1 9 1 8 


.6419 


1.0714 


.0139 


0130 


.4 355 


1.0875 


.1041 


.3272 


.1778 


.2370 


1.0694 


1.1855 


.4475 


1.2185 


$10.8208 


$20.8690 



The Whiting & Davis Ball Team 
has now captured three straight 
games. Keep it up; this is good work. 
We have an exceptionally strong bat- 
ting team. It is only in the field that 
a little weakness is shown. The play- 
ers lack unity as yet and there is too 
much individual playing. For con- 
spicuous playing, watch Harold Jel- 
ly. 



TEN COMANDMENTS FOR DE- 
PARTMENT HEADS. 

1. Be an optimist. Confidence is 
infectious. 

2. Make few promises. Keep 
every promise made. 

3. Every question has two sides. 
Always hear both. 

4. Study your men. Put each 
where he can do his best work. 

5. Never show discouragement. A 
stout heart will never say die. 

6. Don't hold spite. Correct when 
necessary, but forgive afterward. 

7. Notice good work as well as 
bad. Give both credit, and blame 
justly. 

8. Be fair. A foreman often has to 
act as judge, and therefore must be 
just. 

9. Control yourself. Anger is too 
valuable to use except on special oc- 
casions. 

10. Take your full share of the 
blame. Sharing both blame and 
praise with workers is a big part of 
the secret of managing men. 

— Exchange. 



"IT IS NOT EASY." 

To apologize, 

To begin over, 

To be unselfish, 

To take advice, 

To admit error, 

To face a sneer, 

To be charitable, 

To keep on trying, 

To be considerate, 

To avoid mistakes, 

To endure success, 

To keep out of the rut, 

To profit by mistakes. 

To think and then act, 

To forgive and forget, 

To make the best out of little, 

To subdue an unruly temper, 

To maintain a high standard. 

To shoulder a deserved blame. 

To recognize the silver lining. 

BUT IT ALWAYS PAYS. 



Morgan: Hey! Thompson, what 

kind of a board is "fine board"*? 
Thompson: "Saw-dust" of course. 

Tint's as fine as von can uet board. 



WADCO NEWS 



SALESMEN CAMPAIGN TO CUT 
HOTEL RATES AND HARD- 
WARE MEN LAUNCH 
FIGHT 



Launched simultaneously from the 
offices of the National Wholesale Jew- 
elers' Association and the National 
Hardware Association of the United 
States, a vigorous campaign has just 
been started to reduce hotel rates 
throughout the country. 

Circular letters and printed state- 
ments are being sent to all members 
of the National Wholesale Jewellers' 
Association, and the active co-opera- 
tion of all members for a revision of 
hotel rates is solicited. The letter 
refers to the difficulties involved in 
obtaining higher margin of profit and 
nets forth the fact that under present 
conditions, including keen competi- 
tion, "profit margins are narrowing." 
A saving in expenses, therefore, is 
pointed out as the best way of increas- 
ing profits. Among the various "ex- 
pense" headings which could stand 
downward revision the salesmen's 
travelling expenses loom large in the 
mind of the association. 



You cannot do wrong without suf- 
fering wrong. 



HEALTH TALKS 



Mumps (epidemic parotitis) is an 
acute infectious disease characterized 
by fever and by swelling and tender- 
ness of the salivary glands, (glands 
that secrete saliva) usually of the pa- 
rotids near the ear) but sometimes 
of the submaxillary (beneath the 
lower jaw) and sublingual (beneath 
the tongue). 

The period of incubation is long us- 
ually — from two to three weeks. In- 
fection is by direct contact with a pa- 
tient having the disease. 

Complications. Otitis media (in- 
flammation of the middle ear) men- 
ingitis arthritis (inflammation of the 
joints) and albuminuria have occur- 
red during or following the attack. 

Management. Isolation, rest in bed, 
liquid diet and hot and cold applica- 
tions for the relief of pain are usual 
means. Acid and highly seasoned food 
should be avoided. 

When you notice any of the symp- 
toms above mentioned, notify your 
physician. Take proper care of your- 
self and do not expose others to the 
disease. 

By BERTHA G. COTE, 

R I. N. 



Cont'd from page 1, col. 3 
Mexico City has a population of 
1,000,000 people. It is situated in a 
giant basin 7500 feet above sea level, 
surrounded by lofty mountains. From 
it can be seen on a clear day the vol- 
canoes, Ixtaccihuatl ; (pronounced 
Ees-la-see-wal) and the more famous 
Popocatepetl. Bojh are about forty 
miles distant in a southeasterly di- 
rection from Mexico City. The name 
Ixtaccihuatl means "Sleeping Lady", 
given it because its snow capped sum- 
mit so closely resembles a beautiful 
white lady's profile, lying wrapped in 
a' white shroud. Ixtaccihuatl is 17,- 
000 ft. high,; Popocatepetl 17,500 ft. 
high and is the only active volcano of 
the two. We could seethe smoke and 
steam gracefully curling up from its 
crater though we were so many miles 
away. 

We found Mexico City a delightful 
surprise. Most of us imagined that 
with its ten years of revolution, we 
would find the capital city consider- 
ably "run down at the heels", so to 
speak. Especially so when we recall- 
ed the character and policies of many 
of the political parties who have been 
in power since the Diaz regime. How- 
ever, this was not the case. The 
streets were very well kept and the 
residences generally in excellent con- 
dition, many of them as elegant as 
any in our larger cities. The public 
buildings, too, showed no signs of ne- 
glect in their up-keep. Many of them 
are of rare beauty. The new Theatre 
Nacional or National Theatre, just be- 
ing completed by the government at a 
cost of $6,000,000, is a gem. It is an 
architectural masterpiece of white 
marble. While we as a party were 
not allowed to explore its interior on 
account of its semi-finished condition, 
two members gained admittance 
through a bit of convincing. From 
them we learned that the interior is 
beautiful and the furnishings elegant. 
(To be continued) 



Cont'd from page 1, col. 2 
There is seatirg capacity for 146 at 
the 36 tables and on rainy days there 
are few empty chairs. Chef Olsen 
says they will come on good days and 
partake of his menu. 

Mr. Olsen was born in Thondjem, 
Norway, and came to this country in 
1902, working in the Relay House in 
Nahant, Mass., and Phillips Academy, 
Andover, for seven years, where he 
took care of 700 students, among" ihem 
Archie Roosevelt, who was a per onal 
friend. It was his custom to go into 
the college kitchen to chat with the 



MIDDLEBORO NEWS 

We read that of all the failures re- 
corded in 1920, 84 per cent, were of 
firms which did not advertise. We all 
sincerely hope that these new styles 
of mesh bags are "well advertised!" 

Upon asking Gilda if she gave her 
dog any exercise, she immediately re- 
plied, ' ' Oh, sure, he goes for a tramp 
about every day." 

Mrs. Baker firmly believes that 
many are dressed, but few are clothed. 



Editor Rowan and J. O. Gagnon 

By a clever ruse, 

Skipped away from Plainville, 

And came searching here for news. 

They interviewed the correspondent, 
And to her great delight 
Appointed an assistant 
Who knows just what to write. 

Our benches : so convenient, 
Took them by surprise, 
And the carefree, happy workers 
Made them open wide their eyes. 

And when the smiling Editor 
In a manner light and gay, 
Suggested taking pictures 
We could not tell him "nay." 

The sun was shining brightly, 
With many a joke and smile 
They coaxed us to be seated 
And look pleasant for awhile. 

We protestingly submitted 
And let them write our name, 
Tho' to waste the time and film 
We know it was a shame. 

For a thoughtful glance convinced us 
That their efforts were in vain, 
And they'd carry back no pictures 
Their stories to sustain. 

chef. 

The chef has two very capable as- 
sistarts who are with him throughout 
the day. Mary McDonald, for years 
employed at the AVamsutta Hotel, and 
Annie Bialas who came from Brain- 
tree. At noon more help is required 
to serve the food. 

The good will of the employees is 
absolutely eessential for the chef's 
puccess. so he extends to all an invita- 
tion to get acquainted. Tell him if 
von are dissatisfied and he will en- 
deavor to make it right. 



Some bass Byron Gardner caught 
at Lake Pearl last week. He wouldn't 
ray how much it weighed, but he said 
it lowered the lake three inches when 
he nulled it out. 



-^C^CAUGHT in THE MESH*&<^ 



Compensation 



How many realize the meaning of 
Compensation in its defined sense? 

Many there are who look on Coin- 
pensatiox) or Pay as it is commonly 

called as something received for the 
work that we do whether it he in the 
shop, office or in our outside lives as 
an off-setting against labor perform- 
ed. 

How well has our labor been done? 

Have we given good measure? 
- Are we satisfied with the result ? 

And are we willing to subscribe to 
it? 

Can we at the end of the day, and 
do we. look into the portals of our 
inner self satisfied with what we have 
rendered to those who compensate us? 

These are some of the questions we 
should continually ask ourselves if we 
are to succeed. 

It is a well known fact that there 
is always two sides to a question. Now 
the pendulum of the clock swings no 
farther to the one side than to the 
other, so can we expect to be paid or 
compensated, if you will, for the work 
we have done. Do not think for one 
instant when time is wasted that it is 
paid for only by those who employ 
yon. You yourself must pay, some- 
way, somehow, if not at present, then 
in the future for it is a law of nature 
and one of her greatest, "As ye give 
so shall ye receive." 



SOME AD ! 

Recently there appeared in a coun- 
try weekly the following advertise- 
ment : 

"If John Jones, who deserted his 
wife and baby some twenty years ago, 
will return, the said baby will knock 
the stuffing out of him." 

I have decided that I want a bi- 
cycle. If you know of a bargain, you 
will be doing a kindness by informing 
Hattie Coombs. 

Elsie and Cora have now turned to 
the Banana Trees as the Orange 
Groves proved unsuccessful. 

Any man who drives an auto to 
the shop and is not able to put it in 
its proper place in the parking 
grounds ought to have his license re- 
voked. 



We all wonder why. Dot Staples 
takes such good care of her eye-brows. 

Bill Sweet is so bothered by daisies 
that we are afraid he will have hay- 
fever. 

Arthur Plante is thinking of having 
a governor put on his car. 

There is a man in Helen's room, 
He surely likes the girls; 
He likes Brunettes and Blondes, 
He likes the ones with curls. 

Jennie is so charming, 

Isabel is too; 

I know he 'd be so lonesome, 

If they should both get through. 

He does make eyes at Elsie 
It makes us wonder, too; 
Still we know it's better 
To be happy than be blue. 

We know his disposition, 
And we 're all glad to say 
He has a smile to greet us 
•Every single day. 



BLUING 



STEEL BY 
TREATMENT 



HEAT 



Polished steel can be given a blue 
color by heating in hot sand, wood 
?shes or pulverized charcoal. Place 
the substance in an iron receptacle 
and stir constantly while heating in 
order to heat uniformly. Heat just 
hot enough to char a pine stick. Th<> 
narts 1o be blued must be absolutely 
f v ee from urease. They are placed in 
the heated substance until the desired 
color is obtained. Further coloring 
is then checked by immersing in oil. 
Small parts are sometimes heated by 
a Bunsen burner or by laying upon 
a heated plate. For a lisfht-blue col- 
or, heat in sand or wood ashes, and 
for a dark bine, use pulverized char- 
coal. The quality of the color de- 
pends largely upon the fineness of the 
finish. 

Still another method of coloring by 
heat is to immerse the parts in a mol- 
ten bath of potassium nitrate. 



START SOMETHING. 

She : "Do you want to start the 
victrola?" 

He: "Why'" 

She : "It's about time you started 
something." 



To Esther and Augustine : 
The birds are humming, 
"Go feather your nest." 

Why does Mildred D— Sigh 
and cry over her — Burns? 

Mildreu Sehwing is not a champion 
bread maker, but is an artist at golf- 
playing. Only last week she lost el 
en balls and declares that nearly all 
her week's pay is spent in replacing 
them. 

You never have to see Madeline Do- 
ran coming, you can always hear her 
whistle first. 

Dan Quirk has a steady job every 
night after five o'clock hooking rides 
on trucks to Wrentham for a couple 
of girls and himself. How about it, 
Dan? 

What do Maybelle and Lillian care 
for the rain and sleet — when they 
can vamp all the truck drivers and 
get rides home every night of the 
week. 

HOW THE DIFFERENT GIRLS 
KISS 



•"Mildred Miller" bows her stately 
head, 

And fixes her stylish lips. 
In a firm hard way — and let's 'em go. 

And sips, and sips, and sips. 

"Rose Boyle" has a way of her own. 

In a clinging soulful way. 
She takes a kiss that's just as big, 

As a wagon load of hay. 

"Elsie Proil" gets a grip on hers-df. 
And carefully takes off her hat. 

T! en gral s the man in a frenzied 
way. 
Like a terrier grabs a rat. 

"Diana Ireland" takes off her specs. 

So cool — so cold — so glum. 
She sticks out her lips like an open 
book". 

And keeps on chewing gum. 

"Mabel Ingals" never says a word. 

She's so gentle — timid and tame. 
But she grabs a young man by the 
back of the neck, 

And gets there, just the same. 

— Ed.. U. Ration.